Interesting links (weekly)


  • Really makes you wonder what type of system actually works – communism failed, dictatorship usually reaches a violent end, and looking at US & India, democracy also has its pitfalls once the politicians game the system.
    “Globalization and going viral have been the catchphrases of the networked 21st century. But until now the former has mainly referred to a fluid worldwide economy managed by important people, and the latter has mostly meant cute-animal videos and songs by nobodies. This year, do-it-yourself democratic politics became globalized, and real live protest went massively viral. But as they’ve rejuvenated and enlarged the idea of democracy, the protesters, and the rest of us, are discovering that democracy is difficult and sometimes a little scary. Because deciding what you don’t want is a lot easier than deciding and implementing what you do want, and once everybody has a say, everybody has a say. No one knows how the revolutions will play out: A bumpy road to stable democracy, as in America two centuries ago? Radicals’ taking over, as in France just after the bliss and very heaven? Or quick counterrevolution, as in France 60 years later? The mostly liberal, secular young people who made the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt last winter have been subordinated, if not sidelined, by better-disciplined political organizations. And they all agree it’s partly their own fault, a function of naiveté about the realities of democratic politics.”

    tags: time revolution protest

    • Globalization and going viral have been the catchphrases of the networked 21st century. But until now the former has mainly referred to a fluid worldwide economy managed by important people, and the latter has mostly meant cute-animal videos and songs by nobodies. This year, do-it-yourself democratic politics became globalized, and real live protest went massively viral. But as they’ve rejuvenated and enlarged the idea of democracy, the protesters, and the rest of us, are discovering that democracy is difficult and sometimes a little scary. Because deciding what you don’t want is a lot easier than deciding and implementing what you do want, and once everybody has a say, everybody has a say. No one knows how the revolutions will play out: A bumpy road to stable democracy, as in America two centuries ago? Radicals’ taking over, as in France just after the bliss and very heaven? Or quick counterrevolution, as in France 60 years later? The mostly liberal, secular young people who made the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt last winter have been subordinated, if not sidelined, by better-disciplined political organizations. And they all agree it’s partly their own fault, a function of naiveté about the realities of democratic politics.
  • Another useful hack to gain camera stability without a full fledged tripod

    tags: photography diy tutorial camera tripod

  • A pretty useful collection to improve your flash lighting

    tags: photography diy lighting hacks tutorials

  • Make a diffuser (images at the bottom of the post) for you flash. Interesting set of materials used, and the results seem to be pretty effective too.

    tags: flash photography diffuser diy lighting tutorial howto

  • A very helpful article that gets you started with the basics of flash photography. One point in particular that is a striking difference between flash & general shooting is that the shutter speed does not have impact on exposure as long as you are in the sync speed range.

    tags: flash photography tips

  • Very interesting initiative that has digitized many of Newton’s notebooks\papers. Not all the notes are easy to decipher though.

    tags: university newton digital library science notes

  • A site that tells you what stuff you have downloaded using torrents

    tags: torrent downloads tracking

  • Using the Custom Functions to change the default behaviour of the shutter half press & AE lock buttons. This can be very useful if you don’t want the focus to get affected on the shutter half press.

    tags: canon photography settings focus

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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