Modem settings for MTNL broadband

Mahanagar Telephone Nigam Limited

I finally got an MTNL broadband connection at home (Mumbai). Since I decided to get my own TP-LINK modem+wi-fi router (a good value for money model that I plan to review after a couple of months of use), I had to do the modem settings on my own. The settings for some models are available on the MTNL site, but it was missing for my particular model. The modem’s default PPPoE dialer settings did not seem to work, so I decided to check out one of the MTNL documents, and here’s the configuration that I found:

Username: <phonenumber> OR <phonenumber>@a E.g. 12345678 OR 12345678@a

Password: <CA number> (you can find this from your bill, or by calling 1500 from the landline) E.g. 4567890123

VPI: 0

VCI: 32

(The VPI & VCI settings chosen by my modem were different due to which it failed to connect & I had to change them manually to the above settings)

Connection Type: PPPoE LLC

MTU: 1400 bytes (another setting that had a different default on my modem)

MRU: 1492 bytes

Default route: Enabled

NAT: Enabled

Firewall: Disabled

You can also set the DNS servers manually to point to OpenDNS (208.67.222.222/208.67.220.220) or Google’s DNS servers (8.8.8.8/8.8.4.4) which should prevent ISP level DNS blocking of sites, and most likely provide better lookup speeds.

Below is the D-Link modem settings from the MTNL document from where I have picked the settings.

MTNL modem settings

As for the wi-fi settings, you can stick to the defaults – just don’t forget to secure your network using a passkey to keep away free riders.

Blast from the past: Nokia, the N810 Tablet & the Long View

Long in the tooth, but gotta give some leeway, considering that this was written before the App Store debuted on iOS, and before Android (which incidentally is the Linux OS that ate Nokia’s lunch):

Contrast this war with Nokia’s handset, which is based on Linux. Nokia is building a platform that can run arbitrary software. It’ll be messy, and will go through several iterations. But in the end, we know how this story plays out: iPhone is Compuserve; Nokia is the Internet. (Google’s (GOOG) much-speculated mobile device is also rumored to run a pared-down Linux.)

via Nokia, the N810 Tablet & the Long View — Tech News and Analysis.

The Banality of ‘Don’t Be Evil’ by Julian Assange

Makes you think differently about what Google is doing for sure:

The book proselytizes the role of technology in reshaping the world’s people and nations into likenesses of the world’s dominant superpower, whether they want to be reshaped or not. The prose is terse, the argument confident and the wisdom — banal. But this isn’t a book designed to be read. It is a major declaration designed to foster alliances.

“The New Digital Age” is, beyond anything else, an attempt by Google to position itself as America’s geopolitical visionary — the one company that can answer the question “Where should America go?” It is not surprising that a respectable cast of the world’s most famous warmongers has been trotted out to give its stamp of approval to this enticement to Western soft power. The acknowledgments give pride of place to Henry Kissinger, who along with Tony Blair and the former C.I.A. director Michael Hayden provided advance praise for the book.

The Banality of ‘Don’t Be Evil’ by Julian Assange – NYTimes.com.

Tech Companies Pressed by N.Y. Over Handheld Device Thefts

This attitude could so easily be extended to the common man, taxes and administrative corruption – What steps are you taking to save your money from government corruption?

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman wrote to Apple, Google, Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) and Samsung Electronics Co. seeking information about what the companies are doing to combat thefts of their devices in the state, according to copies of the May 10 letters.

via Apple, Google Pressed by N.Y. Over Handheld Device Thefts – Bloomberg.

The Road to Artifical Intelligence

Siri and Google Now are but a tiny drop in the ocean that is going to be AI. We’re quite a few years away, but we’ll get there eventually as hardware develops further and our understanding of the brain continues to grow:

But scientists aren’t just aiming for smaller. They’re trying to build machines that do things computer have never done before. No matter how sophisticated algorithms are, today’s machines can’t fetch your groceries or pick out a purse or a dress you might like. That requires a more advanced breed of image intelligence and an ability to store and recall pertinent information in a way that’s reminiscent of human attention and memory. If you can do that, the possibilities are almost endless.

via The Man Behind the Google Brain: Andrew Ng and the Quest for the New AI | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com.

Google in Ewmer Fudd & more

Tired of viewing Google in plain old English? Then check out these other languages:

www.google.com/intl/xx-hacker
www.google.com/intl/xx-elmer
www.google.com/intl/xx-piglatin
www.google.com/intl/xx-pirate
www.google.com/intl/xx-bork
www.google.com/intl/xx-klingon

You can also set them as the default language from the Preferences section, though good luck figuring things out how to revert to English if you change to something abstract like Hacker.

Google-Ewmer Fudd

via The Secret World of Web Easter Eggs – Secret Google Languages – Slideshow from PCMag.com.

Apple & The Default Narrative

I choose to quote a para supporting the default narrative unlike John Gruber:

That isn’t to say that Apple should be controlling and arrogant, and that their choices don’t create genuine problems worth bitching about. Nobody should pretend it’s good for consumers that Apple doesn’t let Nuance make Swype for iOS and doesn’t let us set Chrome to be our default iPhone browser and that it’s to my benefit that iCloud makes it impossible to use Byword on the Mac and iA Writer on the iPad to edit the same plain text documents. Apple definitely contributes to their own reputation.

via Coyote Tracks – The Default Narrative.

Numbers: Who’s Winning, iOS or Android?

The reports may contradict each other in numbers for iOS and Android, but one thing for sure is that Microsoft and Blackberry have been comprehensively relegated to the “Other” category. It’s also clear that Google and Apple are both winning (Google wants the ad\service revenue which comes from a market share majority, while Apple wants the profits from hardware):

Android if you’re talking about market share; iOS if you mean financial success. So far, this is a strikingly different market than the PC business back in the 1990s, when market share translated directly into financial success.

via Who’s Winning, iOS or Android? All the Numbers, All in One Place | TIME.com.