Securing the Panama Papers

It’s a case of the stolen data being stored more securely than the original.

Source: From Encrypted Drives To Amazon’s Cloud — The Amazing Flight Of The Panama Papers – Forbes

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Spellcheck and bank heists

Why you should pay attention in the language classes:

Attempting to transfer $20 million to a Sri Lankan non-governmental organization called the Shalika Foundation, the hackers instead attempted a transfer to the Shalika “Fandation.” Staff at Deutsche Bank spotted this error and got in contact with the Bangladeshis to ask for clarification. The ruse was discovered and the remaining transfers were canceled.

Source: A typo costs bank hackers nearly $1B | Ars Technica

Security in the times of 3D printing

Another lesson in why you should never show pictures of sensitive keys on the Internet:

The TSA is learning a basic lesson of physical security in the age of 3-D printing: If you have sensitive keys—say, a set of master keys that can open locks you’ve asked millions of Americans to use—don’t post pictures of them on the Internet.

A group of lock-picking and security enthusiasts drove that lesson home Wednesday by publishing a set of CAD files to Github that anyone can use to 3-D print a precisely measured set of the TSA’s master keys for its “approved” locks—the ones the agency can open with its own keys during airport inspections. Within hours, at least one 3-D printer owner had already downloaded the files, printed one of the master keys, and published a video proving that it opened his TSA-approved luggage lock.

Source: Lockpickers 3-D Print TSA Master Luggage Keys From Leaked Photos | WIRED