Interesting links for the week (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Interesting links for the week (weekly)

  • An oldie from before the Google IPO in 2004, that seems hilarious in the current scheme of things, especially with gems like:
    “Look at Google’s competition: Yahoo, Amazon, and soon Microsoft. All three know more about their customers than Google, because all three have many years of portal experience. And Microsoft owns your desktop. Can Google compete?”
    “Google has excellent brand recognition, but how much more saturation of the mass media can we expect before journalists get sick of it?” – Going by the recent hype over G+, the saturation doesn’t seem to have set in even after 8 years.

    tags: google ipo criticism

    • Yahoo is trying too hard to monetize their new search engine, but apart from this they’ve already shown that their technology is as good as Google’s.
    • Google has excellent brand recognition, but how much more saturation of the mass media can we expect before journalists get sick of it?
    • personalized search is the Next Big Thing
    • Look at Google’s competition: Yahoo, Amazon, and soon Microsoft. All three know more about their customers than Google, because all three have many years of portal experience. And Microsoft owns your desktop. Can Google compete?

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Interesting links for the week (weekly)

  • Quite a variety – from ebook organizers to toxicology testers

    tags: opensource projects software

  • Quite a lot of stats to back it with…

    tags: science fans psychology

  • Quite a bit like the railroad vs road transition. Underestimate the customer at your own peril.
    “You’d hear Mike Lazaridis unequivocally state time and time again that BlackBerry smartphones would never have MP3 players or cameras in them because it just does not make sense when the company’s primary customers were the government and enterprise.”
    “RIM would be proud of the fact that someone would only use 1MB of data in a month in 2005”

    tags: smartphones RIM blackberry business innovation

    • You’d hear Mike Lazaridis unequivocally state time and time again that BlackBerry smartphones would never have MP3 players or cameras in them because it just does not make sense when the company’s primary customers were the government and enterprise.
    • A BlackBerry with a name is ridiculous.
    • There was no three-year plan at RIM.” RIM would be proud of the fact that someone would only use 1MB of data in a month in 2005
    • In the corporate world, especially at large companies, the senior executives would buy a BlackBerry as soon as it came out. They would then give their old devices to employees beneath them, and these BlackBerry phones would eventually make their way down through the corporation. This isn’t the case anymore, and now those people that used to receive the hand-me-down BlackBerry devices are asking for shiny new phones.
    • “When you hear Mike talk about the latest and greatest, it’s been the same thing for ten years: security, battery performance, and network performance
    • the data network fees paid to RIM were definitely the number one cause of heartburn from carriers, and a big point of contention.
  • A look back at the experiment by its participants. Interesting insights.

    tags: psychology stanford experiment prison

  • A pretty interesting case – if a monkey clicks some photographs, who owns the copyright & what can be termed as fair use?

    tags: monkey business license copyright news

  • If you thought 9/11 was a catastrophe for the US, think again – the deficit is going to be a much bigger & longer term problem. The beast is starving but not getting any thinner.
    “Why are Republicans reluctant to sit down and talk? Because they would then be forced to put up or shut up. Since they’re adamantly opposed to reducing the deficit with tax increases, they would have to explain what spending they want to cut. And guess what? After three decades of preparing the ground for this moment, they’re still not willing to do that.”

    tags: bankruptcy economics nytimes usa

    • The conservative answer, which evolved in the late 1970s, would be dubbed “starving the beast” during the Reagan years. The idea — propounded by many members of the conservative intelligentsia, from Alan Greenspan to Irving Kristol — was basically that sympathetic politicians should engage in a game of bait and switch. Rather than proposing unpopular spending cuts, Republicans would push through popular tax cuts, with the deliberate intention of worsening the government’s fiscal position. Spending cuts could then be sold as a necessity rather than a choice, the only way to eliminate an unsustainable budget deficit.
    • Why are Republicans reluctant to sit down and talk? Because they would then be forced to put up or shut up. Since they’re adamantly opposed to reducing the deficit with tax increases, they would have to explain what spending they want to cut. And guess what? After three decades of preparing the ground for this moment, they’re still not willing to do that.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Interesting links for the week (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.